TIA and Life insurance

Can I find life insurance after a TIA?

[Quick tip-want to skip the article and find out if you qualify? Call Mike Raines at 678-207-8160 or email mike@specialriskterm.com. Mike has over 30 years experience in the special risk life insurance arena]

A TIA or transient ischemic attack occurs when the blood flow to part of the brain stops for a short time. Finding affordable life insurance after a TIA can be more difficult, but is possible if you are working with an agent or agency who specializes. 

Life insurance companies all look at your health and lifestyle differently. What one company may see as absolutely no issue, another company may highly rate or decline.

Where do I find these companies?TIA and life insurance

Fortunately, you have landed on this page. We deal exclusively with life insurance companies who specialize in underwriting risks like TIA’s, diabetes, heart disease, crohn’s disease, etc.

These companies have the expertise and experience to provide the absolute best quote possible for individuals with a history of TIA.

What information do they need?

When underwriting a life insurance policy for TIA history the carrier will need to know certain information about the medical history of the applicant. It is best to provide this history upfront to your agent. This can save a lot of time and also a lot of money. By providing this information up front your agent can then have the different companies bid for your coverage.

Here is some questions that the underwriting company will need to know:

  • The diagnosis, details and date of the TIA
  • The name of any test run and result. As an example, Carotid ultrasound, Head CT scan or MRI, Echo-cardiogram or Angiography
  • Are you taking any medications
  • Have you been hospitalized for this condition
  • When was the last time you saw a doctor for an evaluation
  • Have you been diagnosed or been treated for any of the following: Elevated cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease,stroke, heart attack or peripheral artery disease?
  • Has surgery ever been done on any carotid artery?
  • Date and reading of last blood pressure?
  • Have you had any limitations or residual effects from the TIA such as limitation of movement, speech or vision?
  • Any other major health impairments?

In addition to the above questions, the carrier will need your current date of birth, height/weight,  male or female, any tobacco use within the last 5 years? Also, what amount of protection is needed?

What happens next?

Once your agent receives the above information they can then go out to the marketplace and discuss with the underwriters options for tentative rates.

The underwriters from the different insurance carriers, who specialize in TIA underwriting will then provide a tentative offer of coverage if available.

Your agent will then provide you with the actual rates on the tentative offers for coverage then make suggestions on how to proceed should the offer be agreeable.

If a tentative offer for coverage is agreeable then a formal application will be taken and formal requirements such as medical exam, lab work and Dr’s reports will be requested to fully underwrite the policy.

Possible offers for coverage when underwriting TIA

When underwriting a life insurance policy insurance carriers typically place risks into one of several different categories. Below we will discuss the categories and the likelihood of what someone with a TIA might qualify for.

  1. Preferred Best- This class is assigned to those individuals in absolute perfect health and meet the height/weight guidelines and participate in no hazardous hobbies or activities. They typically also have excellent lab results, great family history and have never smoked.
  2. Preferred– Very close to the best class, but sometimes may be kicked out of the preferred best due to not meeting one or more criteria such as height/weight guidelines or slightly elevated lab results.
  3. Standard Plus– This class is typically assigned to someone who may fall out of the favorable height/weight guidelines and may also be taking a prescription for high blood pressure or cholesterol.
  4. Standard- Typically individuals with elevated lab results, on medication, outside the height/weight guidelines or some other medical history such as controlled diabetes qualify for standard rates.
  5. Rated classes– Most life insurance companies use a Table rating class for those individuals who do not qualify for standard rates or better. Typically the rating classes begin with Table A, Table B, Table C and so on to a maximum of Table H. Each table rating above standard class typically adds a 25% surcharge to the premium cost.

When underwriting a risk for TIA, the best possible outcome is probably standard rate class. The standard rate class is typically reserved for those with one or two TIA episodes and complete recovery within 24 hours. These class is usually reserved for age 40 or over after TIA.

Other rating classes typical for TIA applicants are from Table 2 to Table 3 for those with complete recovery.

Any complications from TIA or that include other medical impairments such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, etc are debited based on the complicating factors and the current status of the applicant.

As mentioned earlier each life insurance carrier looks at health and lifestyle differently. This is why its important to use an independent life insurance agent who specializes in underwriting risks such as TIA, diabetes, etc.

Conclusion-

If you are in the market for life insurance and have a history of TIA, please contact us if you would like a free consultation. We are independent. We have over 32 years experience in the special risk life insurance marketplace. You will speak directly with the owner and not some large call center. You can reach us at 1-888-393-9003 or mike@specialriskterm.com

About SpecialRiskTerm.com
About SpecialRiskTerm.com

We work with individuals across the nation to secure the best life insurance rates.

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